The Faculty Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning

The Mission of the Faculty Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning is to develop and support pedagogical initiatives that will provide a distinctive and transformative educational experience for our students.

Welcome to the Faculty Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning at Lewis University. Our goal is to help faculty members create a rich and transformative learning environment that provides an engaging and challenging experience for students.

The Center staff members are dedicated to providing faculty with the ability to engage in development activities, to fully integrate innovative technology solutions in the classroom environment and to evaluate student learning, regardless of the modality.

Through personalized support and training, as well as workshops created to introduce new technology and teaching strategies, the Center is dedicated to providing the necessary resources for faculty members to provide a dynamic learning environment for our students.

If you have any questions or have a willingness to lead a workshop in your area of interest or expertise, please do not hesitate to contact us at facultycenter@lewisu.edu.



Assessment

ASSESSMENT

The mission of the Assessment Office is to support the communication and implementation of a cohesive university-wide assessment system for continuous improvement of student learning and institutional effectiveness at Lewis University.

Assessment >>

Faculty Development

FACULTY DEVELOPMENT

The Faculty Development Committee serves as liaisons by providing advisory support and advocating for faculty initiatives that promote professional growth including mentoring, scholarship, and pedagogy that support student success in the spirit of the Lasallian Mission.

Faculty Development >>

Academic Technology

ACADEMIC TECHNOLOGY & INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN

The Academic Technology Solutions Team focuses on advancing teaching and learning through the development, support and research of technologies related to instructional strategies for faculty and students.

Academic Technology & Instructional Design >>


Workshops







Staff



Lisa Caldwell
Faculty Development and Support Technologist
caldweli@lewisu.edu
(815) 836-5748


Samantha Kinser
Senior Academic Technologist
skinser@lewisu.edu
(815) 836-5518



Joe Jirka
Learning Management System (LMS) Administrator
jirkajo@lewisu.edu
(815) 836-5668


Andy Alton
Academic Technologist
aalton@lewisu.edu
(815) 836-5160



Faculty Spotlight


Dr. Maureen Culleeney

Dr. Maureen Culleeney

Author, Scholar, Business Professional, Professor, and self-described "Mother Hen" to our Lewis students

Our Lewis University faculty members bring a wealth of experience to the classroom so it was no surprise to learn about Dr. Maureen Culleeney’s career path in business and technology and how it led her to Lewis University. Beginning in the early 1980s, Maureen explains that she began working in the computer industry for Ashton Tate, a U.S. based Software Company that was known for database products. “I started out as a computer trainer traveling 10-15,000 miles a month, and found that I really enjoyed teaching…and eventually, writing.” Authoring two books – Wordstar Simplified: Mastering the Essentials on the I.B.M. Personal Computer and Lotus 1-2-3 Mastery: A Business Guide to 1-2-3 Productivity– her career took another turn – only this time towards higher education. “I taught briefly at Roosevelt University and eventually applied to Lewis. I started out as an MBA Advisor until a teaching position became available and I am happy to say I haven’t looked back.”

Reflecting back to the introduction of computers in business, she states that “early on, I saw different types of new software being used to enhance productivity for workers that gave businesses the ability to interconnect with other organizations using that software. At the time, I saw pros and cons, like I do now. Speed can cross several time zones, which is great, but when you’re developing business relationships - particularly in sales - you want to have that relationship as a one-on-one contact. It’s important.”

In the Business Communications class, Maureen teaches her multi-tasking, electronically-engaged students the art of human engagement in the workplace, focusing in on the critical nuances to look for. “I try to teach my students how to successfully communicate any topic in the workplace – good or bad – and how to pick up on subtleties in business communication. It is important to know how to convey a negative message as much as a positive one. We use role play activities for this – what would you say to this person if you were face-to-face? First we start out with the buffers – the good things – and then we get to the negative. We look at examples on what not to do when relaying written negative communications.”

She also coaches students on the how to stick to the basic fundamentals of business etiquette when using social media platforms. One piece of advice she gives to students is to “be more careful before hitting the send button because leaving one negative or derogatory comment can sink a career. In our classroom discussion about Defamation – spoken or written – we talked about the potential for litigation. I’m actually surprised we don’t see more of it. I tell students to type out what they want to convey, but to wait a while before sending.”

And what about job interviews and first impressions? “Very important,” she explains, “because it’s not always about credentials and a perfect resume. My students watch a video in which two candidates for a job are interviewed. One candidate has all of the credentials, but isn’t really pulled together. He is lax and says the wrong things. The next candidate does not have the strong credentials as the first, but she is polished and professional and it is apparent that she is the better fit for a corporate environment. Now, my students laugh at the first candidate but I can see more serious faces when the second candidate comes in. Not only that, but they actually straighten up in their chairs – their personal demeanors change.”

When asked how she views her role at Lewis, she stated the following:

“I’m very proud of our Lewis students – they are very special. Have you ever noticed how friendly and nice everyone in the Lewis community is?  At the beginning of every semester I always ask if there is anyone new to our University – maybe a transfer. If so, I tell them that I think they will find the Lewis community of faculty, staff and students a great place to be. I couldn’t be more proud of our community and our students. It’s a family atmosphere. Sometimes I feel like a “mother hen” getting her children ready for the world. I like to see the evolution that takes place with our students. They come in as freshmen, young and eager to learn and leave as young adults, sporting a cap and gown and ready for the world! The whole Lewis experience is what gets them ready; not just me.”

Preparing our Lewis students for success is Dr. Culleeney's personal mission and inspired by the Lewis University Catholic and Lasallian mission values of association, knowledge, fidelity, wisdom and justice. It is apparent that her mission-focused approach to teaching and learning is crucial in providing our students with the professional education necessary to successfully compete in the global marketplace.