Office of Multicultural Student Services

Diversity DVD Library

Civil Rights

1.  America’s Civil Rights Movement (DVD & VHS – 38 min.s – Discussion Kit)  This video depicts the battle for civil rights as told by it foot soldiers. They rode where they weren’t supposed to ride; walked where they weren’t supposed to walk; sat where they weren’t supposed to sit. And they stood their ground until they won their freedom.

2.  A Place at the Table (DVD & VHS – 40 min.s - Discussion Kit)  This video spans three centuries to show how individuals and groups have toppled barriers in education, transportation, voting, employment, housing and other areas to become full participants in our democracy.

3.  A Time for Justice (DVD – 38 min.s ) Film depicts the battle for civil rights as told by its foot soldiers. They rode where they weren't supposed to ride; walked where they weren't supposed to walk; sat where they weren't supposed to sit. And they stood their ground until they won their freedom. Produced by three-time Academy Award winner Charles Guggenheim, A Time for Justice recalls the crises in Montgomery, Little Rock, Birmingham and Selma. But more importantly, it reveals the heroism of individuals who risked their lives for the cause of freedom and equality. The film opens at the cemetery where Jimmie Lee Jackson is buried. Jackson was killed by state troopers during a voting rights demonstration in Marion, Alabama. The words of one who remembered Jackson lead us into a compelling story of a people's transcendent courage.

4.  Children’s March (DVD 40 min.s)  The Academy Award-winning,40 minute documentary film, Might Times:  The Children March tells the story of how young people of Birmingham, Alabama, braved fire hoses and police dogs in 1963 and brought segregation to its knees.  The heroism moved President Kennedy to introduce the Civil Rights Act of 1964, a key piece of federal legislation that transformed not just the south but the entire nation.

5.  Mendez vs. Westminster (DVD 45 min.s) Seven years before Brown vs. Board of Education, Mendez vs. Westminster began unraveling of school segregation in the U.S.  Among many surprises, two key persons played important roles in both cases; NAACP attorney Thurgood Marshall, who later argued and won Brown vs. Board of Education; and then Governor Earl Warren who desegregated California as a result of Mendez and later, as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court wrote the Brown decision.

Seven years before Brown v. Board of Education, Mendez vs. Westminster began unraveling of school segregation in the U.S. Among many surprises, two key persons played important roles in both cases; NAACP attorney Thurgood Marshall, who later argued and won Brown v. Board of Education; and then-Governor Earl Warren who designated California as a result of Mendez and later, as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court wrote the Brown decision.  Mendez vs. Westminster is the award winning Public Television documentary that tells the story of this little known; but important chapter of American civil-rights history.  2007 marked the 60-year anniversary of the Mendez decision, and the U.S. Postal Service issued a stamp to honor this historic contribution to our schools.

6.  Viva La Causa (DVD 39 min.s) On a warm evening in 1965, hundreds of Mexican farm workers packed into a church hall in the small farming town of Delano, California.  A momentous decision lay before them, should they join a strike against California grape growers started 11 days prior by their Filipino counterparts.  Would this improve their appalling working conditions in the fields and help them earn enough to feed their families?  Viva La Causa tells the story of how the powerless stood up in the powerful and gained their victory, not by violence and weapons; but by their strong will.